Thien Thanh Dang-Vu

Thien Thanh Dang-Vu, MD, PhD

Director - Associate Professor

Overview: Dr. Dang-Vu is a neurologist with expertise in sleep medicine. He is an Associate Professor in the Department of Exercise Science at Concordia University, and holds a Concordia University Research Chair in Sleep, Neuroimaging and Cognitive Health. Dr. Dang-Vu is a researcher at the PERFORM Center and the Center for Studies in Behavioral Neurobiology. He is also a researcher and the Associate Director for Clinical Research at the Centre de Recherche de l’Institut Universitaire de Gériatrie de Montréal (CRIUGM), affiliated with Université de Montréal. His expertise includes human sleep physiology, sleep disorders and the use of neuroimaging in sleep research.

Thanh Dang-Vu earned his M.D. in 2004 at the Université de Liège, in Belgium. He then completed his residency in Neurology and a Ph.D. in Biomedical Science in the same university. He did a post-doctoral fellowship in the department of Neurology at the Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School in Boston. He completed a second postdoctoral fellowship at the Center for Advanced Research in Sleep Medicine at the Université de Montreal and Hôpital du Sacré-Coeur de Montréal. He won several research awards, notably from the Sleep Research Society, the European Sleep Research Society, the Belgian Association for Sleep Research and Sleep Medicine, and the Belgian Neurological Society. He joined Concordia University in 2012, where he is currently an Associate Professor and holds the University Research Chair in Sleep, Neuroimaging and Cognitive Health. He is  a CIHR New Investigator and a FRQS Research Scholar. Dr Dang-Vu is also an attending neurologist and the Associate Director for Clinical Research at the Institut Universitaire de Gériatrie de Montréal (IUGM), a Clinical Assistant Professor of Neuroscience at University of Montreal, and an Adjunct Professor of Neurology and Neurosurgery at McGill University.

Read my CV

In general, my research interests are focused on the interface between neuroimaging, sleep, and neurology, in order to investigate the neural correlates of spontaneous brain activity and consciousness, the role of sleep in brain plasticity, the pathophysiology of sleep disorders, and the clinical biomarkers of neurological disease progression.

I am particularly interested in the mechanisms and functions of brain rhythms during sleep. These neural oscillations (sleep spindles, slow waves) organize brain activity during sleep and modulate important functional properties of sleep. For instance, using simultaneous functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) and electroencephalography (EEG), my previous studies demonstrated the role of these brain rhythms in the neural processing of external information (e.g., sounds) during sleep. Current research in my lab further explores the role of sleep oscillations in cognition and brain plasticity, in healthy participants and patients with neurological disorders (e.g., stroke, neurodegenerative diseases), using functional and structural neuroimaging techniques, and electrophysiological recordings.

Another line of research in my laboratory investigates the pathophysiology of sleep disorders, such as insomnia, hypersomnias and parasomnias, using multimodal neuroimaging and EEG. Beyond the identification of the neural mechanisms responsible for sleep disruption and daytime somnolence, these studies aim at further understanding the clinical evolution and cognitive impact of these disorders, in order to inform treatment options.

Offices


Concordia University, L-SP 165-27
7141 Sherbrooke West
Montreal, QC
CA H4B 1R6


CRIUGM, M7834
4545 Chemin Queen-Mary
Montréal, QC
CA H3W 1W5

Phones


Concordia University
+1 (514) 848-2424, x3364


CRIUGM
+1 (514) 340-3540, x3991

Email address
Biography

Thanh Dang-Vu earned his M.D. in 2004 at the Université de Liège, in Belgium. He then completed his residency in Neurology and a Ph.D. in Biomedical Science in the same university. He did a post-doctoral fellowship in the department of Neurology at the Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School in Boston. He completed a second postdoctoral fellowship at the Center for Advanced Research in Sleep Medicine at the Université de Montreal and Hôpital du Sacré-Coeur de Montréal. He won several research awards, notably from the Sleep Research Society, the European Sleep Research Society, the Belgian Association for Sleep Research and Sleep Medicine, and the Belgian Neurological Society. He joined Concordia University in 2012, where he is currently an Associate Professor and holds the University Research Chair in Sleep, Neuroimaging and Cognitive Health. He is  a CIHR New Investigator and a FRQS Research Scholar. Dr Dang-Vu is also an attending neurologist and the Associate Director for Clinical Research at the Institut Universitaire de Gériatrie de Montréal (IUGM), a Clinical Assistant Professor of Neuroscience at University of Montreal, and an Adjunct Professor of Neurology and Neurosurgery at McGill University.

Read my CV
Research interests

In general, my research interests are focused on the interface between neuroimaging, sleep, and neurology, in order to investigate the neural correlates of spontaneous brain activity and consciousness, the role of sleep in brain plasticity, the pathophysiology of sleep disorders, and the clinical biomarkers of neurological disease progression.

I am particularly interested in the mechanisms and functions of brain rhythms during sleep. These neural oscillations (sleep spindles, slow waves) organize brain activity during sleep and modulate important functional properties of sleep. For instance, using simultaneous functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) and electroencephalography (EEG), my previous studies demonstrated the role of these brain rhythms in the neural processing of external information (e.g., sounds) during sleep. Current research in my lab further explores the role of sleep oscillations in cognition and brain plasticity, in healthy participants and patients with neurological disorders (e.g., stroke, neurodegenerative diseases), using functional and structural neuroimaging techniques, and electrophysiological recordings.

Another line of research in my laboratory investigates the pathophysiology of sleep disorders, such as insomnia, hypersomnias and parasomnias, using multimodal neuroimaging and EEG. Beyond the identification of the neural mechanisms responsible for sleep disruption and daytime somnolence, these studies aim at further understanding the clinical evolution and cognitive impact of these disorders, in order to inform treatment options.

Contact details
Offices


Concordia University, L-SP 165-27
7141 Sherbrooke West
Montreal, QC
CA H4B 1R6


CRIUGM, M7834
4545 Chemin Queen-Mary
Montréal, QC
CA H3W 1W5

Phones


Concordia University
+1 (514) 848-2424, x3364


CRIUGM
+1 (514) 340-3540, x3991

Email address
Selected publications